Trump Administration

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (August 18–25)

America’s white-collar prosecution crisis; Elizabeth Warren has a new bill that aims to separate money from politics; Facebook struggles with the daunting task of...

Any Press is Good Press? Study Finds Federal Investigations of University Responses to Sexual Misconduct Cases May Help Enrollments

Despite concerns among administrators that news coverage of campus sexual assault will harm universities’ reputations and bottom lines, a study finds an increase in applications...

How Might A Justice Kavanaugh Impact Antitrust Jurisprudence?

Throughout his judicial career, the US president’s latest nominee to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, has written three antitrust opinions. Here, Stephen Calkins of...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (July 7–14)

Brett Kavanaugh is expected to bring his pro-business bent to the Supreme Court; the DOJ is appealing the AT&T-Time Warner merger approval; Britain fines...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (May 26–June 2)

Google gives up Project Maven following "terrible" backlash; angry Facebook shareholders demand an end to Mark Zuckerberg's "dictatorship"; American startups are in a 13-year slump; and Italy...

How US Voters React to Immigration in the Voting Booth May Depend on Both Immigrants’ and Native Residents’ Skill Levels

A new working paper has revealed two strikingly divergent correlations between increases in high-skilled and low-skilled immigration and change in Republican vote share since...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (May 4–May 12)

A whistleblower alleges fraud in the audits of Silicon Valley companies; AT&T acknowledges that hiring Michael Cohen was a "bad mistake"; new analysis finds that...

Editors’ Briefing: On Our Radar This Week (April 1–April 7)

This week in political economy.       Facebook acknowledged this week that the Cambridge Analytica data breach affected 87 million users (reportedly including 2.7 million Europeans)—37...

Editors’ Briefing: On Our Radar This Week (March 24-March 31)

This week in political economy.       Still mired in the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook’s terrible month became worse this week after BuzzFeed published a 2016...

When Taxpayers Subsidize Corporate Lobbying: How Firms Use Charitable Giving to Influence Politics

A new Stigler Center working paper examines a more roundabout way that companies can influence legislators: by donating money to charities in lawmakers’ districts....

LATEST NEWS

Lifting Lockdown Measures Won’t Bring Back Lost Jobs, New Study Suggests

A new paper examines data on local outbreaks in South Korea and finds that even in the absence of lockdowns, an increase...

What Comes Next for Economic Policies to Combat Covid-19? A Conversation Between Six Booth Faculty

As the Covid-19 crisis evolves from a temporary shock into what seems like a long-term catastrophe, six finance scholars from Chicago Booth—Douglas...

A New Stigler Center Case Study Explores the Link Between Italy’s Morandi Bridge Disaster and Crony Capitalism

Two years ago, the Morandi bridge collapse claimed 43 lives. Based on financial statements, Italian government documents, and interviews with independent experts...

Few Bad Apples? New Study Finds That 40 Percent of Officers in a Large Police Force Are Discriminatory

A new paper seeks to examine whether police misbehavior is concentrated or diffuse by identifying whether highway patrol officers in Florida are...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Wirecard, Shale Oil, and the Fall of Chuck E. Cheese

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean.