Monopsony

The Darkest Side of Monopsony: The South Korean Case

"Chaebols”, large business groups controlled by founder families, are usually considered a crucial ingredient of South Korea's economic miracle. But after a process of...

Antitrust’s Monopsony Problem

Four cases from the past decade alleging employer collusion against workers show that at present, antitrust law is ill-equipped to protect workers. A root...

Banning Noncompete Agreements Benefits Low-Wage Workers

Examining the effects of a 2008 ban on noncompete agreements for low-wage workers in Oregon, a recent paper finds that the ban increased average...

How Amazon's Pricing Policies Squeeze Sellers and Result in Higher Prices for Consumers

Amazon's price matching policies, which were meant to ensure its dominant position, diminished the ability of brands to control how their products are distributed...

Restoring Antimonopoly Through Bright-Line Rules

The “consumer welfare” approach to antimonopoly is the main contributor to the extreme and dangerous concentrations of power that Americans face today. In place...

Regulators Should Not Change the Regulatory Environment to Include Labor Market Concentration

Research has shown that labor markets with higher levels of labor market concentration have lower wages. It does not necessarily follow that regulators should...

Why Local Labor Market Concentration Is Lower Than It Used to Be, Even As National Concentration Increases

A new study compares the trends in national and local industrial concentration between 1976 and 2015, and explains why they diverged.     The idea that firms...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (July 7–14)

Brett Kavanaugh is expected to bring his pro-business bent to the Supreme Court; the DOJ is appealing the AT&T-Time Warner merger approval; Britain fines...

Data Workers of the World, Unite!

With solutions to the threats of digital monopolies currently looking unlikely to come from the state, law and economics scholars Eric Posner and Glen...

Strong Employers and Weak Employees: Study Sheds New Light on How Labor Market Concentration Hurts Workers

New study finds that wages are significantly lower in concentrated labor markets—and even lower in labor markets where unionization rates are low.     America’s decades-long wage...

LATEST NEWS

Lifting Lockdown Measures Won’t Bring Back Lost Jobs, New Study Suggests

A new paper examines data on local outbreaks in South Korea and finds that even in the absence of lockdowns, an increase...

What Comes Next for Economic Policies to Combat Covid-19? A Conversation Between Six Booth Faculty

As the Covid-19 crisis evolves from a temporary shock into what seems like a long-term catastrophe, six finance scholars from Chicago Booth—Douglas...

A New Stigler Center Case Study Explores the Link Between Italy’s Morandi Bridge Disaster and Crony Capitalism

Two years ago, the Morandi bridge collapse claimed 43 lives. Based on financial statements, Italian government documents, and interviews with independent experts...

Few Bad Apples? New Study Finds That 40 Percent of Officers in a Large Police Force Are Discriminatory

A new paper seeks to examine whether police misbehavior is concentrated or diffuse by identifying whether highway patrol officers in Florida are...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Wirecard, Shale Oil, and the Fall of Chuck E. Cheese

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean.