Lobbying

Study: Political Connections Lower Companies’ Tax Rates and Risk of Being Audited

How does the revolving door between Congress and corporate America affect the enforcement of tax policy? A new study examines how tax rates change...

The Political Footprint of Big Tech in Five Easy Charts

Big tech firms have been active in Washington since the early days of the Microsoft antitrust case, but in recent years they have increased...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (May 19–26)

Trump signs the largest rollback of financial regulations since the 2008 crisis into law; Zuckerberg masterfully evades the questions of European parliamentarians; Amazon has...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (April 14–April 28)

Why has Facebook’s scandal not dented its earnings? How much are states and local governments giving to corporations in economic-development incentives? And did CFPB...

Editors’ Briefing: On Our Radar This Week (April 1–April 7)

This week in political economy.       Facebook acknowledged this week that the Cambridge Analytica data breach affected 87 million users (reportedly including 2.7 million Europeans)—37...

When Taxpayers Subsidize Corporate Lobbying: How Firms Use Charitable Giving to Influence Politics

A new Stigler Center working paper examines a more roundabout way that companies can influence legislators: by donating money to charities in lawmakers’ districts....

Guns and Votes: The Victory of an Intense Minority Against an Apathetic Majority

This column on the "gun-control paradox"—the fact that gun regulations continually fail in the US Congress despite being supported by around 90 percent of...

Editors’ Briefing: On Our Radar This Week (Dec. 9–Dec. 16)

This week in political economy.      House and Senate Republicans released the final version of their tax bill late Friday afternoon. The Washington Post breaks...

Study: Politicians Vote Against the Will of Their Constituents 35 Percent of the Time

New Stigler Center working paper: “To the extent that legislators represent majority opinion, it happens largely because legislators share the opinions of their constituents,...

How Many Newt Gingrich's Are There in Washington? Much More Than You Might Think

As more and more lobbyists move to consulting and PR agencies, experts say the underworld of hidden lobbying is probably much bigger than what formal...

LATEST NEWS

Why Privacy Experts Need a Place at the Antitrust Table

Antitrust enforcers have tended to stay narrowly “in their lane,” failing to engage with how data is collected and used by digital...

Assessing George Stigler’s Economic Theory of Regulation

Despite its flaws and limitations, Stigler’s seminal article on the theory of economic regulation remains an important piece of scholarship worthy of...

“Old Chicago” and Freiburg: Why Ordoliberalism Was No “German Oddity”

Both the Chicago and Freiburg schools faced systemic fragility as the crucial property of societal orders. It was this fragility that served...

The Many Faces of Stigler’s Theory of Economic Regulation: Interest Group Politics Still Thrives—But Industry Often Comes Second

Stigler treats industry groups as the heavyweights in regulatory contests. But surprisingly often groups of farmers and workers knock them for a...

Why the FTC Should Consider Size in Drug Mergers

Large pharmaceutical firms retain their dominance through size-related advantages in three areas: contracting, marketing and selling, and financing. When reviewing pharmaceutical mergers,...