Labor

What does NCAA v. Alston Tell Us About Antitrust and Labor Markets?

The Supreme Court's recent ruling against the NCAA and in favor of student-athletes may seem narrow or trivial, but the Court's acknowledgement...

The Profit Paradox: “What’s Good for Firms Is Not Necessarily Good for the Workers”

In an interview with ProMarket, Jan Eeckhout discusses his new book The Profit Paradox and explains how market power brings down wages,...

Eliminating Baseball’s Antitrust Exemption Won’t End the Georgia Political Boycott

There are good arguments for getting rid of baseball's long-standing exemption from antitrust laws, but the reason cited by Republican Senators angry...

Organized Mimicry: Employers Against the Free Market

"Despite all the rhetorical support for free markets, it turns out that employers would rather corner their market, not free it, especially...

The End of the Capitalist-Worker Dichotomy and the Rise of a New Elite?

Economists typically assume that capitalists and workers are different people. A new study, however, finds that the intersection between the top decile...

More and More Employers Are Spying on Workers Online. Federal Regulators Are Okay With It

Employers today have numerous tools at their disposal to monitor workers’ behavior and communications. Outdated federal regulations and an administration that prioritizes...

How the Covid-19 Pandemic Will Affect Four Types of Labor

A tremendous shock like that of the coronavirus totally unbalances new demand for four different types of labor. The category policymakers should be...

Antitrust Law’s Current Stance Toward Workers Violates Its Original Purpose to Balance Power With Powerful Firms

Antitrust law’s present-day bias against democratic cooperation and in favor of top-down corporate control has contributed more broadly to the institutional weakness and perceived...

Antitrust’s Monopsony Problem

Four cases from the past decade alleging employer collusion against workers show that at present, antitrust law is ill-equipped to protect workers. A root...

Western Multinationals Can Improve Workers' Safety, If They Want to: The Case of Bangladesh

In 2013, one of the largest factories in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,134 workers. Many multinationals committed to improving safety standards. A new study shows...

LATEST NEWS

Beefing Up Merger Enforcement by Banning Merger Remedies

The unraveling of the T-Mobile/Sprint remedy continues a trend of failed merger consent decrees. One solution, proposed by two antitrust scholars, is...

Reaching for Influence: Do Banks Use Loans to Establish Political Connections?

A new study examines whether privately-owned banks seek political influence by offering preferred loan terms to corporate borrowers with valuable political connections,...

The New Challenges of Assessing Big Tech’s Impact

Big Tech firms are facing the biggest wave of antitrust legislation in their history. Academic literature reveals the complexity of possible consequences...

The Metaphysics of Regulatory Capture

Stiglerian capture and corrosive cultural capture, its left-leaning parallel, are ostensibly symbionts, two attempts at identifying impediments to keeping markets competitive by...

The Aristocracy of Talent: Business Intelligence

In the following excerpt from his new book, The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, Adrian Wooldridge traces "how universities...