Labor

How the Covid-19 Pandemic Will Affect Four Types of Labor

A tremendous shock like that of the coronavirus totally unbalances new demand for four different types of labor. The category policymakers should be...

Antitrust Law’s Current Stance Toward Workers Violates Its Original Purpose to Balance Power With Powerful Firms

Antitrust law’s present-day bias against democratic cooperation and in favor of top-down corporate control has contributed more broadly to the institutional weakness and perceived...

Antitrust’s Monopsony Problem

Four cases from the past decade alleging employer collusion against workers show that at present, antitrust law is ill-equipped to protect workers. A root...

Western Multinationals Can Improve Workers' Safety, If They Want to: The Case of Bangladesh

In 2013, one of the largest factories in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,134 workers. Many multinationals committed to improving safety standards. A new study shows...

Banning Noncompete Agreements Benefits Low-Wage Workers

Examining the effects of a 2008 ban on noncompete agreements for low-wage workers in Oregon, a recent paper finds that the ban increased average...

The Lousy Job Economy: Young People Bear the Brunt of a Long-Term Decline in American Job Quality

A new study finds a steady decline in the quality of American jobs between 1979 to 2017, even as GDP has grown. This decline...

How Robert Bork Fathered the New Gilded Age

Much like in the first Gilded Age, antitrust enforcers today are hitting labor, not capital. This is thanks to Robert Bork’s radical and influential...

The Employment Effects of a Gender-Specific Minimum Wage

The first minimum-wage laws in the history of the United States were predominantly gender-specific in that they were imposing a lower bound only on...

The Limits of Private Action: What the Past 40 Years Taught Us About the Perils of Unregulated Markets

The two big ideas that animated American public policy since the end of World War II, employer-sponsored social benefits and neoliberalism, are failures. We...

Restoring Antimonopoly Through Bright-Line Rules

The “consumer welfare” approach to antimonopoly is the main contributor to the extreme and dangerous concentrations of power that Americans face today. In place...

LATEST NEWS

How Political Conflict Shapes Macroeconomics: Alberto Alesina’s Intellectual Legacy

One of the most respected economists of his generation, Harvard professor Alberto Alesina suddenly died at 63. His friend and colleague Guido...

“Alberto Alesina Always Knew Where The Big Ideas Were”

Harvard economist Alberto Alesina passed away at 63. Paola Giuliano, UCLA professor and Alesina's co-author, recalls his intellectual and human legacy: "He...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Fracking, Germs, and the Global Financial Crisis

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

We Need More Respectful and Inclusive Experiments in Development Economics: A Proposal

After many years of field research in Uganda, three economists outline how to prevent a powerful research tool such as randomized...

Indecent Proposals in Economics: The Moral Problem With Randomized Trial Experiments

The advent of field Randomised Control Trials (RCTs) has made it more acceptable for applied economists to collect data in developing countries....