Interviews

Can Investigative Journalism Overcome the Rational Ignorance of Voters?

In the third and final part of our interview with Stanford economist James Hamilton, we discuss the connection between investigative journalism, human interest stories...

"Information Is a Public Good"

In the second part of our interview with Stanford economist James Hamilton, we discuss the costs of investigative journalism, the link between the degree of...

"There's a Set of People Who Do Understand What's Going on in Washington, But That Story Isn't Told Broadly"

How much does investigative journalism cost? What are its benefits? Why is it so hard to monetize? Can markets keep on providing this service?...

“Google Is as Close to a Natural Monopoly as the Bell System Was in 1956"

Media scholar Jonathan Taplin, author of the new book Move Fast and Break Things, on the rent-seeking and regulatory capture of digital platforms. In 2014,...

“There Is No Indication That Trump Is Pro-Competition”

A new paper by economists Steven C. Salop and Carl Shapiro explores what antitrust might look like under President Trump. In an interview with...

“We Are Arrogant – We hold On to Our Old Beliefs on the Gains of Trade”: ProMarket Interviews Bernard Yeung, Part 3

The third and final part of ProMarket's interview with Bernard Yeung, Dean of the National University of Singapore’s business school and one of the...

“In a System with Dominance, There is Built-In Resistance to Change”: ProMarket Interviews Bernard Yeung, Part 2

In the second part of his interview with ProMarket, Bernard Yeung—one of the economists who laid the foundations of scientific research on economic power...

Could the Fed Have Rescued Lehman Brothers? Q&A with Laurence Ball

A new study argues that the Federal Reserve could have saved Lehman Brothers from bankruptcy, but chose not to, partly because of political pressures.  Eight-and-a-half years ago,...

“When There Isn't Enough Churning of Big Corporations, the Economy Stagnates”: Q&A with Bernard Yeung

Bernard Yeung, one of the predominantly non-U.S.-born economists who laid the foundations of scientific research on economic power concentration, offers insights relevant to the...

Do Mergers Benefit or Harm the Economy? Q&A with Bruce Blonigen

A new paper finds that mergers allow firms to raise prices, but finds no evidence that they improve productivity or efficiency. Do large mergers benefit or harm consumers? Over...

LATEST NEWS

Tech Platforms and the Antitrust Duty to Deal

Why is there a widespread view that existing American antitrust law is ill-equipped to address dominant platforms that exclude or discriminate against...

Study: the Covid-19 Eviction Moratoriums Helped Reduce Food Insecurity and Mental Stress

A new study investigates the impact of 2020 Covid-19 rental eviction moratoria on the wellbeing of US households, finding that eviction moratoria...

Cogs and Monsters: Is Economics Destined to Remain a Dismal Science?

In her bold new book Cogs and Monsters: What Economics Is, and What It Should Be, Cambridge professor Diane Coyle offers a...

Is there a “California Effect” in Data Privacy Law? Why the EU is Not the World’s Privacy Cop

It is common lore in data privacy law and other fields that stringent regulatory standards (such as the ones introduced in the...

Governments Were Forced to Restrict Civil Liberties to Deal With Covid-19. More Flexible Constitutions Could Prevent That From Becoming the New Normal

A new paper argues that exploitation of gaps within democratic constitutions during emergencies, such as the Covid-19 pandemic, has the potential to...