Financial Crisis

Americans Report Record Level of Trust in Banks and Big Corporations, But not in the US Government

2019 Chicago Booth/Kellogg School Financial Trust Index increases from 27.6 percent to 33.3 percent, showing the highest level of financial trust from the American...

How Antimonopoly Was Revitalized, Part 2: Barack Obama and the End of the End of History

In this second installment of his three-part series on antitrust’s recent resurrection, Matt Stoller discusses the legacy of Obama’s presidency. The real policy for...

Ten Years After the Financial Crisis: “We Are Safer, But Not As Safe As We Should and Could Be”

Experts from academia and industry gathered at the University of Oxford to revisit what went wrong in the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis,...

“In the Wake of the 2008 Crisis, You Can't Ignore the Influence of Big Business on Economic Policy”

Historian and author Adam Tooze talks to ProMarket about how the financial crisis “remade” American capitalism, why the US response to the crisis was...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (September 7–16)

Is the government's response to the 2008 financial crisis responsible for the rise of populism in the US and Europe?; the real Google censorship...

How the Triple Tax Exemption on Puerto Rico’s Bonds Financed Its Territorial Status—and Helped Spark Its Debt Crisis

How did Puerto Rico manage to incur a monumental debt of $72 billion without raising red flags among the sophisticated investors who continuously bought...

What Schumpeter Can Teach Economists about the Great Recession

Ten years after Lehman Brothers’ failure, Schumpeter’s analysis of the Great Depression and his warnings to posterity are as timely as they are prophetic,...

Why Are There So Few Bankers on American Corporate Boards?

Relatively few American companies have bankers on their boards. New research reveals that bankers were commonly represented on corporate boards in the 19th century,...

Editors’ Briefing: This Week in Political Economy (May 19–26)

Trump signs the largest rollback of financial regulations since the 2008 crisis into law; Zuckerberg masterfully evades the questions of European parliamentarians; Amazon has...

Can Credit Tightening Spur Social Unrest? Evidence from 1930s China

In 1933 the United States launched its Silver Purchase program, which raised silver prices worldwide, drained China’s silver stock, and caused credit to Chinese...

LATEST NEWS

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Wirecard, Covid-Overwhelmed Hospitals, and Plastic

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

“50 Years Later, It’s Time to Reassess”: Raghuram Rajan on Milton Friedman and Maximizing Shareholder Value

The biggest problem with shareholder value maximization is that it completely turns a tin ear to politics. The alternative is to maximize...

It Is Time to Move on From Friedman’s View of the Corporation

The anti-CSR position defended by Friedman would be acceptable only under conditions that have never been met by any real-world economy. Furthermore,...

Corporations Are Already Plenty Powerful. Stakeholder Capitalism Could Make Them More So

Encouraging corporations to further step into the role of governments and civil society groups by becoming more "socially focused" risks greater depreciation...

The Real Effects of Environmental Activist Investing

A new study examines the efficacy of climate-focused investor engagements initiated by the New York City Pension System. Its findings support the...