“Monetary Awards Are Not the Only Reason Why Whistleblowers Report Corporate Malpractice”

At the SEC, Jordan Thomas had a leadership role in developing the program to protect and reward employees who report corporate wrongdoing. Now, he is a lawyer who exclusively represents SEC whistleblowers: “The award is not the only driver, nor the primary driver, but it is an important factor to help people feel comfortable in coming forward”.  

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US Big Business vs China: How Monopolies Harm National Security

China’s goal is to concentrate power, both within China and over Western industrial commons. The best reaction is not to mimic Chinese autocratic control of the economy through monopolies. When the US government used antitrust to reduce market power in the domestic market, innovation flourished and the country was militarily stronger. 

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Capitalisn’t in a New Episode on the Gig Economy: A Reading List

Companies like Uber, Lyft, and Doordash have brought the term “gig economy” into our lexicon. But what is the gig economy, really? In the episode of their podcast, Kate Waldock and Luigi Zingales debate the pros, cons, and myths of the gig economy. For curious listeners, a list of the articles and papers discussed in this episode. 

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The Amazon of Health Care: How CVS Is Evolving From a Drug Store Chain into a Tech Platform

CVS is built on a dominant chain of drug stores, but it is now trying to turn itself into a “uniquely powerful platform” for delivering health care. It uses one part of the supply chain to squeeze competitors in another part of the industry.    

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With the Court Approval of the T-Mobile/Sprint Merger, the Dominant Doctrine in Antitrust Has Jumped the Shark

New York Judge Victor Marrero allowed two major mobile companies to merge in an already concentrated telecom industry, ensuring that prices will rise and service quality will decrease. His decision destroys Robert Bork’s frame that antitrust law is based on economic evidence, revealing Bork-style antitrust as basically just a ruse.

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Can Google Mobilize Its Users to Lobby Elected Officials?

Google has an 87 percent market share in the search business and the potential to mobilize more voters than the Democratic primaries, according to the latest Chicago Booth/Kellogg School Financial Trust Index Survey. By profiling its users, Google could identify those who are more keen to respond to its “call to action.”

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Like Microsoft, but With More Glitter: The Cheerleading Monopoly Problem

Cheerleading is a huge part of American culture. It’s also an expensive sport, especially after a company called Varsity Brands bought the National Cheerleader Association in 2004 and built the perfect monopoly, thanks to acquisitions, vertical integration, and lobbying to prevent regulation.   

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How Do Members of Congress React to the Potential of Lucrative Private Sector Employment?

Many fear that the potential for well-paid post-elective jobs can make legislators give rewards to their future employers. A new study finds that career prospects in the private sector do induce legislators to leave office and that US senators become more moderate before they voluntarily leave office through the revolving door. They also become more productive and more aligned with the priorities of special interest groups.   

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Over 60 Leading Finance Economists Ask SEC to Revise the Shareholder Voting Draft Reform

The new regulation that Security and Exchange Commissioners voted in November doesn’t fix proxy advisory industry duopoly problems, but it actually makes them worse: A group of scholars from major American universities filed a comment to ask the SEC to amend the proposed reform of public companies corporate governance.    

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Purdue Circumvented the Regulator to Promote OxyContin, Hiding Its Real Risk of Addiction

In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration required Purdue to change OxyContin’s patient package inserts to make addiction risks more evident. The company altered the label to make it appear as though illegal use and abuse were the only addiction-related problems associated with OxyContin. Eventually, Purdue hired the FDA’s medical reviewer for OxyContin. 

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