Research and Papers

Is There Really a Conflict Between Better Corporate Governance and More Competitive Product Markets?

A new study shows that the supposed tradeoff between better corporate governance and more competitive product markets may not exist. More commonly-owned...

The Non-Revolving Door Between the SEC and the Plaintiffs’ Bar

Nowhere does the “revolving door” spin more quickly than at the Securities and Exchange Commission. But, even at the SEC, not all...

Barking Up the Right Tree: How Shareholder Activists Raise Issues to Placate Large Mutual Funds

A new paper examines whether shareholder activists tailor their campaigns to persuade large institutional investors and finds that in proxy communications, activists...

Covid-19 Surges Drive Up Demand – and Pay – For Nurses Willing To Travel

Covid-19 surges have led to spikes in demand for short-term nurses across the United States. A new paper finds nurses travel longer distances, and...

Judges Who Use Economic Reasoning in Court Decisions Rule In Favor of Business More Often

A new paper finds that judges who attended law schools with a strong law-and-economics intellectual environment use more economic reasoning, which is positively correlated with...

Reversing the “Resource Curse” with Foreign Corruption Regulation

Anti-corruption regulation originating in developed countries is effective in changing corporate behavior and has a positive economic impact on developing countries.

Why Social Distancing Measures Seem Less Effective in the US

Guidelines assume that the less people move around, the less likely they are to be in contact. However, phone location data show...

How to Restart the Economy and Save Lives: Simulations on Northern Italy

Italian officials have to choose the optimal strategy to end the lockdown. A policy that sends all the active population back to...

How Inequality Hurts the Economy and Complicates Policy Responses to the Pandemic

In the years leading up to the pandemic, rising inequality created a saving glut of the rich which pushed down interest rates...

Inequality Has Increased Far Less Than You Think (If You Consider Social Security Benefits)

In the United States, Social Security accounts for nearly 60 percent of the total wealth of the bottom 90 percent. Once Social Security is...

Latest news

Female Academics Are Disproportionately Affected By Covid-19 Disruptions In Childcare

A new paper finds that academics who are parents to young children, and especially mothers, have lost a significant amount of research...

Rethinking Competition: From Market Failures to Ecosystem Failures

Despite the overwhelming importance of digital platforms, and the chatter around their recent rise, our understanding of digital ecosystems is still limited....

A Famed Economist’s Public Company U-Turn

Michael Jensen, a leading late 20th century economist, pivoted from praising public companies in the 1970s to assailing public company governance in...

Chinese Antitrust 2.0: Why Is China Going After Its Big Tech?

In an interview with ProMarket, Angela Huyue Zhang, author of a new book Chinese Antitrust Exceptionalism, discusses the motivations behind the recent...

Preventing Drug Shortages and Saving Lives: The Role of Quality and Reliability Standards

Prescription drug shortages have become more common in recent years, interrupting usual medical care and increasing patient risk and system costs, but...

Facebook Break-up Can Be Feasible, Efficient, and Ultimately Beneficial to Consumers

Is the relief sought by the FTC in its case against Facebook the right way to go? In principle, yes. However, the...

A Simple Way to Measure Tipping in Digital Markets

Digital markets are prone to “tipping.” Policymakers are starting to look at tipping as a market failure worthy of consideration. But as...