Research and Papers

Why Social Distancing Measures Seem Less Effective in the US

Guidelines assume that the less people move around, the less likely they are to be in contact. However, phone location data show...

How Are Americans Coping With the Covid-19 Crisis? 7 Key Findings From a Household Survey

New research from the Rustandy Center and the Poverty Lab at the University of Chicago finds that lower-income Americans, especially women,...

How to Restart the Economy and Save Lives: Simulations on Northern Italy

Italian officials have to choose the optimal strategy to end the lockdown. A policy that sends all the active population back to...

Insider Trading Data Reveals Pandemic Is a Time for Questioning, Not Answering

Following news reports about executives selling shares in their corporations to avoid losses due to the pandemic, a new study takes a...

How Inequality Hurts the Economy and Complicates Policy Responses to the Pandemic

In the years leading up to the pandemic, rising inequality created a saving glut of the rich which pushed down interest rates...

Inequality Has Increased Far Less Than You Think (If You Consider Social Security Benefits)

In the United States, Social Security accounts for nearly 60 percent of the total wealth of the bottom 90 percent. Once Social Security is...

Covid Economics: The Marcoeconomic Impact of the Pandemic and Policy Responses

ProMarket reviews the most recent and interesting academic papers on the ongoing pandemic: One paper argues that people do not always fully internalize the...

From Borrowing to Stockpiling: How The Virus Outbreak Changed American Household Consumption

The first academic study of American consumers' reaction to the pandemic finds that total spending rose by half between February 26 and March 11,...

Managing Expectations Is Critical to Ensure Compliance with Stay-at-Home Measures

A study of a representative sample of Italians finds that 50 percent of respondents reported having adopted all recommended actions, including staying at home,...

The Darkest Side of Monopsony: The South Korean Case

"Chaebols”, large business groups controlled by founder families, are usually considered a crucial ingredient of South Korea's economic miracle. But after a process of...

Latest news

The United States: An Exceptional Case? A Webinar With Stephen Haber, Richard R. John, and Luigi Zingales

Many see the US as a land where free markets and antitrust enforcement have historically kept monopolies under control. But is that...

Bethany McLean’s Fourth of July Weekend Reading List: Jeff Bezos, Homeschooling, and How to Make Capitalism Work for All

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

Lifting Lockdown Measures Won’t Bring Back Lost Jobs, New Study Suggests

A new paper examines data on local outbreaks in South Korea and finds that even in the absence of lockdowns, an increase...

What Comes Next for Economic Policies to Combat Covid-19? A Conversation Between Six Booth Faculty

As the Covid-19 crisis evolves from a temporary shock into what seems like a long-term catastrophe, six finance scholars from Chicago Booth—Douglas...

A New Stigler Center Case Study Explores the Link Between Italy’s Morandi Bridge Disaster and Crony Capitalism

Two years ago, the Morandi bridge collapse claimed 43 lives. Based on financial statements, Italian government documents, and interviews with independent experts...

Few Bad Apples? New Study Finds That 40 Percent of Officers in a Large Police Force Are Discriminatory

A new paper seeks to examine whether police misbehavior is concentrated or diffuse by identifying whether highway patrol officers in Florida are...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Wirecard, Shale Oil, and the Fall of Chuck E. Cheese

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean.