Research and Papers

Is There Really a Conflict Between Better Corporate Governance and More Competitive Product Markets?

A new study shows that the supposed tradeoff between better corporate governance and more competitive product markets may not exist. More commonly-owned...

The Non-Revolving Door Between the SEC and the Plaintiffs’ Bar

Nowhere does the “revolving door” spin more quickly than at the Securities and Exchange Commission. But, even at the SEC, not all...

Barking Up the Right Tree: How Shareholder Activists Raise Issues to Placate Large Mutual Funds

A new paper examines whether shareholder activists tailor their campaigns to persuade large institutional investors and finds that in proxy communications, activists...

Covid-19 Surges Drive Up Demand – and Pay – For Nurses Willing To Travel

Covid-19 surges have led to spikes in demand for short-term nurses across the United States. A new paper finds nurses travel longer distances, and...

Judges Who Use Economic Reasoning in Court Decisions Rule In Favor of Business More Often

A new paper finds that judges who attended law schools with a strong law-and-economics intellectual environment use more economic reasoning, which is positively correlated with...

Reversing the “Resource Curse” with Foreign Corruption Regulation

Anti-corruption regulation originating in developed countries is effective in changing corporate behavior and has a positive economic impact on developing countries.

Why Social Distancing Measures Seem Less Effective in the US

Guidelines assume that the less people move around, the less likely they are to be in contact. However, phone location data show...

How to Restart the Economy and Save Lives: Simulations on Northern Italy

Italian officials have to choose the optimal strategy to end the lockdown. A policy that sends all the active population back to...

How Inequality Hurts the Economy and Complicates Policy Responses to the Pandemic

In the years leading up to the pandemic, rising inequality created a saving glut of the rich which pushed down interest rates...

Inequality Has Increased Far Less Than You Think (If You Consider Social Security Benefits)

In the United States, Social Security accounts for nearly 60 percent of the total wealth of the bottom 90 percent. Once Social Security is...

Latest news

When Do Users Benefit From Platform Mergers?

A new paper shows that platform mergers can harness network effects at the cost of reducing the platform differentiation that users value. 

Harold Demsetz and Israel Kirzner Understood That Competition Regulates Markets

Economists Harold Demsetz and Israel Kirzner challenged the prevailing orthodoxy in microeconomic analysis and public policy beginning with their respective work in...

The Covid-19 Pandemic Should Not Delay Actions to Prevent Anticompetitive Consolidation in US Health Care Markets

Harvard Business School professor Leemore Dafny lays out potential reforms to assist agencies in halting anticompetitive acquisitions and practices, and to preserve...

Who Benefits From Competitive State-Level Legislatures?

A new paper finds that when interparty competition in state legislatures is high, well-connected and influential incumbent firms are best able to...

No More “Mystery Meat”: Why We Need Better Corporate Governance Data

Three decades of finance, economics, and legal studies in corporate governance have been built substantially on data sets with nearly unknown provenance....

How Protests Against the Jim Crow Credit Market Changed the Civil Rights Movement

Before the civil rights movement captured the nation’s attention, activists and community groups were protesting against exploitative credit and exclusionary lending practices...

George Stigler and the Challenge of Democracy

We are all victims of what George Stigler described as “the pervasive use of state support of special groups” and of governance...