RESEARCH

The Non-Revolving Door Between the SEC and the Plaintiffs’ Bar

Nowhere does the “revolving door” spin more quickly than at the Securities and Exchange Commission. But, even at the SEC, not all...

Are Large Institutional Investors Actually Effective in Getting Companies to Reduce Their CO2 Emissions?

Large institutional investors have been accused of not doing enough to reduce CO2 emissions. However, a new study finds that firms like BlackRock, Vanguard,...

Income-Driven Repayment Provides a Way to Offer Student Loan Forgiveness to Those Who Need It the Most

Direct loan cancellation is not the only policy option to lower student debt. If policymakers want more targeted loan forgiveness, aimed at lower income...

Barking Up the Right Tree: How Shareholder Activists Raise Issues to Placate Large Mutual Funds

A new paper examines whether shareholder activists tailor their campaigns to persuade large institutional investors and finds that in proxy communications, activists...

Covid-19 Surges Drive Up Demand – and Pay – For Nurses Willing To Travel

Covid-19 surges have led to spikes in demand for short-term nurses across the United States. A new paper finds nurses travel longer distances, and...

Judges Who Use Economic Reasoning in Court Decisions Rule In Favor of Business More Often

A new paper finds that judges who attended law schools with a strong law-and-economics intellectual environment use more economic reasoning, which is positively correlated with...

Reversing the “Resource Curse” with Foreign Corruption Regulation

Anti-corruption regulation originating in developed countries is effective in changing corporate behavior and has a positive economic impact on developing countries.

The Covid-19 Vaccine is Nearly Here. The Question is: Will People Take It?

In addition to the challenges involved in manufacturing and distributing the new Covid vaccine from Pfizer, the reluctance of many Americans to...

The “Turbulent Twenties” Are Just Beginning

Years ago, two academics predicted that an increase in economic inequality would lead to a period of political instability in 2020. Since...

Covid-19 Is Reducing Americans’ Confidence Across Institutions

Latest US household survey findings reveal that the Covid-19 crisis caused a sharp reduction in Americans’ confidence in institutions—whether or not they...

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The Aristocracy of Talent: Business Intelligence

In the following excerpt from his new book, The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, Adrian Wooldridge traces "how universities...

Why Privacy Experts Need a Place at the Antitrust Table

Antitrust enforcers have tended to stay narrowly “in their lane,” failing to engage with how data is collected and used by digital...

Assessing George Stigler’s Economic Theory of Regulation

Despite its flaws and limitations, Stigler’s seminal article on the theory of economic regulation remains an important piece of scholarship worthy of...

“Old Chicago” and Freiburg: Why Ordoliberalism Was No “German Oddity”

Both the Chicago and Freiburg schools faced systemic fragility as the crucial property of societal orders. It was this fragility that served...

The Many Faces of Stigler’s Theory of Economic Regulation: Interest Group Politics Still Thrives—But Industry Often Comes Second

Stigler treats industry groups as the heavyweights in regulatory contests. But surprisingly often groups of farmers and workers knock them for a...

Why the FTC Should Consider Size in Drug Mergers

Large pharmaceutical firms retain their dominance through size-related advantages in three areas: contracting, marketing and selling, and financing. When reviewing pharmaceutical mergers,...

In FTC vs. Facebook, the Government Lost the First Round. It Could Still Win the Fight.

Despite some compelling allegations, a federal judge dismissed the FTC's antitrust complaint against Facebook due to the agency’s failure to explain how...