Academic Capture

Purdue Circumvented the Regulator to Promote OxyContin, Hiding Its Real Risk of Addiction

In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration required Purdue to change OxyContin’s patient package inserts to make addiction risks more evident. The company altered...

“The Question Is Whether We Live in a Democracy or a Corporate State”

In an interview with ProMarket, Goliath author Matt Stoller discusses the political choices that led to the downfall of the American antimonopoly movement and the “addiction to...

The Best Political Economy Books of 2019

A history of American antimonopoly, the case against Big Tech, and how Europe got better than the US at free markets: here are (in no...

OxyContin's Academic Marketing: The Studies That Fueled the Opioid Crisis

Purdue Pharmaceuticals used to cite three major studies to argue that in prescribing OxyContin, addiction-risk was not significant. The most influential of those studies...

Western Multinationals Can Improve Workers' Safety, If They Want to: The Case of Bangladesh

In 2013, one of the largest factories in Bangladesh collapsed, killing 1,134 workers. Many multinationals committed to improving safety standards. A new study shows...

Uber’s “Academic Research” Program: How to Use Famous Economists to Spread Corporate Narratives

Uber's employees co-authored academic papers with brand name scholars that were then used to back the company's PR and lobbying strategy. Published in respected...

The Uber Bubble: Why Is a Company That Lost $20 Billion Claimed to Be Successful?

In the first of three interrelated articles, transportation consultant Hubert Horan discusses Uber's "uncompetitive economics." There is no real innovation in the company's business...

Political Economy, Blind Spots, and a Challenge to Academics

Anat Admati calls on economists and academics to engage with governance and political economy issues, scrutinize models before applying them to the real world,...

The Harvard Admission Lawsuit Decision Does Not Answer the Main Question: What Are Top Universities For?

A judge ruled this month that Harvard does not discriminate against Asian-American applicants, according to its own criteria. But what kind of students do...

Economics’ Lack of Interest in Gender Proves: the “Dismal Science” Really Is Dismal

Economists are still in the dark about the role of gender. For economics to be credible, we have to recognize that our knowledge is...

Latest news

A New Browser Extension Aims to Bring Transparency to Big Tech Funding

As Congress prepares to debate a series of new antitrust bills​, the​ Big Tech Funding browser extension encourages lawmakers to be mindful...

What Are They Hiding? What Firms Don’t Want Us to Know About Their Economic Development Incentives

State and local governments offer firms all kinds of incentives in hopes of spurring local economic development. New research finds that a...

Two Years After the Business Roundtable Statement: Pointing in the Right Direction

The 2019 Business Roundtable statement was a welcome break from the position that the nation’s top corporate CEOs took in 1997, when...

The Complicated Legacy of the “Chicago Boys” in Chile

How did a group of Chicago-trained economists manage to turn Chile into the cradle of neoliberalism? As the country aims to move...

“Comments for Sale”: Charitable Donations Can Lead Non-profits to Support Corporate Regulatory Agendas

A new paper shows how financial ties between companies and non-profits can subvert rulemaking process and lead to regulations that favor the...

The DOJ’s “New Madison” Doctrine Disregards Both the Economics and the Law of Innovation

DOJ’s “New Madison” approach to antitrust and intellectual property law dictates that antitrust should stay out of disputes over patents, even when...

Two Years Later, Has the Business Roundtable Statement Transformed Capitalism?

Two years after the Business Roundtable redefined its statement of Purpose of a Corporation to include “a fundamental commitment to all of...