Academic Capture

Tainted Philanthropy in Higher Education

Our institutions of higher education should apply appropriate ethical and academic standards when considering financial donations; otherwise, they risk promoting the private interests of...

Are the Findings in Academic Economic Journals to be Trusted?

A growing number of studies provide evidence that editors (and referees) of academic journals often publish only findings showing a significant effect or surprising...

The Most Persistent of All Zombie Ideas: That Taxing the Wealthy Is Destructive to the Economy

Economics can’t tell you what values to have. It can, however, shed light on what to expect from policy that reflects any particular set...

The World Bank's "Papergate": Censorship Is Not the Best Way to Stop Development Aid From Fueling Corruption

A new study of World Bank data finds that aid disbursement to highly aid-dependent countries coincides with sharp increases in bank deposits in offshore...

With the Court Approval of the T-Mobile/Sprint Merger, the Dominant Doctrine in Antitrust Has Jumped the Shark

New York Judge Victor Marrero allowed two major mobile companies to merge in an already concentrated telecom industry, ensuring that prices will rise and...

Data-Driven Ideology: The Problem With Economists' Takeover of Policymaking

According to New York Times journalist Binyamin Appelbaum's recent book The Economists' Hour, economics is not the unbiased science that it pretends to be, but...

The Epstein Report: How a Convicted Criminal Could Use MIT to Whitewash His Reputation

The only reason why a pedophile's donations did not violate any MIT policy is that MIT does not have any policy to prevent embarrassing...

Corporations and the Rise of the Chicago Law and Economics Movement

From its birth in 1946 onward, corporations made possible and crucially supported the rise of the Chicago law and economics movement. Aaron Director,...

Purdue Circumvented the Regulator to Promote OxyContin, Hiding Its Real Risk of Addiction

In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration required Purdue to change OxyContin’s patient package inserts to make addiction risks more evident. The company altered...

"The Question Is Whether We Live in a Democracy or a Corporate State"

In an interview with ProMarket, Goliath author Matt Stoller discusses the political choices that led to the downfall of the American antimonopoly movement and the “addiction to...

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Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Eastman Kodak, Private Equity Hospitals, and America’s First Female Recession

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

Tech Monopolies Are the Reason the US Now Has a TikTok Problem

Tech platforms like Facebook say we should protect, empower, and celebrate their concentrated power for the sake of America’s national security. But...

Police Stops of Black Drivers Increase Following Trump Rallies, New Study Suggests 

A new study looks into how Trump's 2016 presidential campaign affected police behavior toward Black Americans and finds that the probability that...

Big Tech Is Officially Too Big to Manage

Last week’s Congressional hearing on Big Tech showed the CEOs of the four largest tech platforms unable to answer basic questions about...

The House’s Big Tech Hearing: Break Ups Large and Small?

Last week’s epic House hearing on online platforms raised many issues, chief among which was the question who gets to operate at...

How Hedge Fund Performance Fees Fail Investors

In the hedge fund industry, there is a material disconnect between funds’ lifetime performance and lifetime incentive fees for managers. A new...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Google, Shale, and Fraudulent Honey

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean.