Techlash Goes to Court

In FTC vs. Facebook, the Government Lost the First Round. It Could Still Win the Fight.

Despite some compelling allegations, a federal judge dismissed the FTC's antitrust complaint against Facebook due to the agency’s failure to explain how...

Why the FTC Antitrust Case Against Facebook Was Dismissed

Many of the problems with the FTC complaint against Facebook that was dismissed in court last month appear to be fixable. However,...

Identifying the Market In the Facebook Antitrust Case

Facebook can be a monopolist over a cluster of noncompeting products that do not fit the standard economic definition of a “market.”...

Facebook Break-up Can Be Feasible, Efficient, and Ultimately Beneficial to Consumers

Is the relief sought by the FTC in its case against Facebook the right way to go? In principle, yes. However, the...

Reviewing Facebook’s Mergers Could Have Negative Ripple Effects

How the pre-merger notification regime came about and why we should be careful about discouraging useful mergers.

The Antitrust Cases Against Facebook And Google: In Search of a Smoking Gun

In the Microsoft antitrust case, Bill Gates’ emails were perhaps the government’s most compelling evidence. Now, as regulators pursue antitrust cases against Facebook...

Why Isn’t the FTC Tackling Facebook’s Data-opoly?

Nothing in the FTC’s and states’ complaints’ prayer for relief seeks to give users greater control over their data, such as not...

The FTC’s Antitrust Case Against Facebook: Injunction, Divestiture, or Breakup?

While the FTC’s lawsuit against Facebook is unlikely to lead to a “breakup,” it could force Facebook to undo some mergers. Breaking things up...

Facebook Could Be Heading Towards a Breakup

Assuming Facebook’s acquisitions can be shown to have eliminated emerging rivals, reversing those acquisitions via divestiture—“the most important of antitrust remedies”—is the...

What the Department of Justice Can Learn from the European Union’s Antitrust Investigations Into Google

The Department of Justice has opened antitrust investigations into Google's (alleged) attempt to monopolize online advertising. While the case recycles old grievances...

Latest news

How the Rise of Labor Market Power Helps Explain the Fall of US Manufacturing Employment

A new working paper explores the increase in labor market power in the US and what’s driving it. It shows manufacturing workers...

How Manufacturing’s Lobby Won and Lost its Political Influence

What happens when supporting capitalism hurts capitalists? Do business lobbies ever control the economy to the extent we think they do? The...

How Apple Locks Out the Competition with Its Digital Key

Apple’s efforts to dominate the contactless payments market and lock up the “digital key” space pose a profound threat to consumer privacy...

The Dawn of Antitrust and the Egalitarian Roots of the Sherman Act

While it isn’t particularly controversial that concentrated economic power was a legislative target of the Sherman Act, when read as a corollary...

The Varied Ideologies—and Practices—of Socialist Nations in the Developing World

In an excerpt from his new book Ripe for Revolution: Building Socialism in the Third World, Harvard Business School professor Jeremy Friedman...

How Much Can We Trust Index Funds on Climate Change?

According to a theory that is gaining support among academics and practitioners, we should expect index fund managers to undertake the role...

The Ties that Bind Workers to Firms: No-Poach Agreements, Noncompetes, and Other Ways Firms Create and Exercise Labor Market Power

Collusive no-poach agreements are per se illegal, but noncompete clauses are not. Recent research casts doubt on the rationale for this legal...