Academic Capture

Tainted Philanthropy in Higher Education

Our institutions of higher education should apply appropriate ethical and academic standards when considering financial donations; otherwise, they risk promoting the private interests of...

Are the Findings in Academic Economic Journals to be Trusted?

A growing number of studies provide evidence that editors (and referees) of academic journals often publish only findings showing a significant effect or surprising...

The Most Persistent of All Zombie Ideas: That Taxing the Wealthy Is Destructive to the Economy

Economics can’t tell you what values to have. It can, however, shed light on what to expect from policy that reflects any particular set...

The World Bank's "Papergate": Censorship Is Not the Best Way to Stop Development Aid From Fueling Corruption

A new study of World Bank data finds that aid disbursement to highly aid-dependent countries coincides with sharp increases in bank deposits in offshore...

With the Court Approval of the T-Mobile/Sprint Merger, the Dominant Doctrine in Antitrust Has Jumped the Shark

New York Judge Victor Marrero allowed two major mobile companies to merge in an already concentrated telecom industry, ensuring that prices will rise and...

Data-Driven Ideology: The Problem With Economists' Takeover of Policymaking

According to New York Times journalist Binyamin Appelbaum's recent book The Economists' Hour, economics is not the unbiased science that it pretends to be, but...

The Epstein Report: How a Convicted Criminal Could Use MIT to Whitewash His Reputation

The only reason why a pedophile's donations did not violate any MIT policy is that MIT does not have any policy to prevent embarrassing...

Corporations and the Rise of the Chicago Law and Economics Movement

From its birth in 1946 onward, corporations made possible and crucially supported the rise of the Chicago law and economics movement. Aaron Director,...

Purdue Circumvented the Regulator to Promote OxyContin, Hiding Its Real Risk of Addiction

In 2001, the Food and Drug Administration required Purdue to change OxyContin’s patient package inserts to make addiction risks more evident. The company altered...

"The Question Is Whether We Live in a Democracy or a Corporate State"

In an interview with ProMarket, Goliath author Matt Stoller discusses the political choices that led to the downfall of the American antimonopoly movement and the “addiction to...

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Prison Labor Can Create Perverse Incentives for Incarceration and Reduce Trust in Legal Institutions

Government proponents of prison labor should be mindful of the potential for negative effects, including increased incarceration rates and citizens’ deteriorating views...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Robinhood, Quibi, and Corporate America’s Addiction to Debt

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

How Germany Managed to Outlaw Facebook’s Core Business Model

In a surprise ruling last month, the German Federal Court of Justice determined that Facebook must comply with an earlier decision by...

Tailoring Lockdowns for Developing Countries

The Covid-19 pandemic has decimated livelihoods in developing nations, and coronavirus-related deaths are rising in Africa and South Asia at an alarming...

Why Most Advertisers Can’t Afford to Boycott Facebook

While big brands can afford to pause their addiction to Facebook, most advertisers cannot participate, as they have become so dependent on...

Can Covid-19 Erode Young Individuals’ Trust in Politics for Decades to Come?

A new study shows that exposure to an epidemic during one's “impressionable years” (18-25) has a persistent negative effect on trust in...

The United States: An Exceptional Case? A Webinar With Stephen Haber, Richard R. John, and Luigi Zingales

Many see the US as a land where free markets and antitrust enforcement have historically kept monopolies under control. But is that...