Roy Shapira

Roy Shapira is a legal scholar who focuses on the interactions between regulation, reputation, and litigation. His book on the topic, Law and Reputation, just came out with Cambridge University Press. Shapira received his LLM and SJD degrees from Harvard Law School, and he is currently an associate professor at the IDC Law School.

President-Elect Joe Biden and the Real Lessons of DuPont

Simply talking corporate America into being more responsible is not enough. It may get corporations to talk the talk, but not to...

How the Legal System Helps the Media Hold the Powerful to Account

The legal system is the bloodline of investigative journalism. Recent maneuvers by the Trump administration may jeopardize it.     When done effectively, investigative journalism can greatly...

Does Environmental Crime Pay?

A new Stigler Center working paper conducts a cost-benefit analysis of DuPont's emissions of a toxic chemical dubbed C8. The Trump administration has shown clear signs that it...

Managing Political Risk

A recent working paper suggests that firms react to political risk, both passively by cutting investment and employment, and actively by ramping up lobbying efforts. From Trump...

Attorneys General for Sale? We Should Focus on the Practice, Not Just on Trump’s Role

Trump is not the only, nor the biggest, player in the game of influencing attorneys general. Singling him out for opprobrium is aiming at the...

Regulators as Validators

Special interest groups can use their influence over regulation to water down not just potential legal sanctions but also potential reputational sanctions. What deters corporate...

Making it Look Like a Struggle

 For capture to be sustainable, the regulator has to find ways to be perceived as being tough on the regulated without really hurting them. The...

Who Killed Corporate Reputation?

Regulation and reputation are not independent of each other. Regulation can substitute, crowd out, or even implement the power of reputational concerns. A better understanding...

Do Courts Have a Pro-Business Bias?

Existing evidence are not enough to determine whether courts are pro-market or pro-(incumbent)business. President Obama’s plan to nominate Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court...

Corporate Governance Externalities: How Directors’ Reputational Concerns Shape Governance of Other Firms

A new paper by Wharton’s Doron Levit and Carroll’s Nadya Malenko fleshes out the role that reputation plays in shaping the structure and effectiveness of...

Latest news

Academic Gatekeepers, Real and Imagined, Are Threatening the Credibility of the Field of Political Finance 


One objective of political finance is to hold power to account. However, gatekeeping, both direct and indirect, is keeping important work from...

A Call for Comments: Have You Been Affected by Academic Gatekeeping?

On Friday, ProMarket published a piece by Renée Adams about the impact of academic gatekeeping in the political finance. Do you have...

How Big Data Fuels Big Tech’s Anticompetitive Conduct and Gatekeeping Power

Achieving a truly open internet is only possible through robust online competition free from the control of today’s digital gatekeepers like Facebook...

The Corporate Power Narrative: How Corporations Benefit from Economic Globalization

In an excerpt from their new book, Six Faces of Globalization: Who Wins, Who Loses, and Why It Matters, Anthea Roberts and...

Managers Should Satisfy Only the Ethically Permissible Preferences of Shareholders

Oliver Hart and Luigi Zingales have proposed a revision to the dominant model of the objective of the firm, most famously defended...

Plagues Upon the Earth: How Wealth Intersects With Mortality

Kyle Harper’s new book, Plagues Upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History, shows that the story of disease is...

What Accounts for the Gender Equality Among Pharmacists?

In her new book Career and Family: Women’s Century-Long Journey toward Equity, Harvard Professor Claudia Goldin traces how generations of women have...