Randy Picker

Randal C. Picker is the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School and Senior Fellow at the Computation Institute of the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory.

The House’s Recent Spate of Antitrust Bills Would Change Big Tech as We Know It

If enacted, the five bills that were introduced in the House this month would represent the most dramatic statutory changes to US...

Europe Lacks a Vision for How Apple’s App Store Fees Should Work

The European Commission believes that Apple is violating European competition laws and raising prices for consumers in how it operates its App...

Forcing Interoperability on Tech Platforms Would Be Difficult to Do

Governments around the world seem to be on a path to turn the leading tech firms into public utilities. Interoperability is likely...

Reviewing Facebook’s Mergers Could Have Negative Ripple Effects

How the pre-merger notification regime came about and why we should be careful about discouraging useful mergers.

Kicking Around Section 230: Don’t Confuse Politics and Policymaking

Congressional hearings may make for good TV and viral social media posts, but reforming Section 230 would be more difficult than it...

Structural Separation and Self-Preferencing: What are the Right Lessons of History?

IBM’s entry into the PC market can teach us a lot about the risks involved with the sort of structural separations recommended...

The House’s Big Tech Hearing: Break Ups Large and Small?

Last week’s epic House hearing on online platforms raised many issues, chief among which was the question who gets to operate at...

At the Heart of the European Commission’s Investigations of Apple Is a Basic Question: How Should Apple Make Money?

Just like Spotify, Apple has amassed an installed base of users. Spotify sells its users to advertisers while Apple sells its users...

The European Commission Picks a Fight with Google Android over Business Models

UChicago Law’s Randy Picker puzzles over the rationale behind last week’s multibillion-euro fine on Google by the European Commission. While the decision makes a...

With Amex Ruling, Modern IO Theory Makes Important Inroads with SCOTUS

SCOTUS Forum. In this second post in our roundtable of op-eds on the Supreme Court’s June 25 Amex decision, UChicago’s Randy Picker looks at...

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How the Rise of Labor Market Power Helps Explain the Fall of US Manufacturing Employment

A new working paper explores the increase in labor market power in the US and what’s driving it. It shows manufacturing workers...

How Manufacturing’s Lobby Won and Lost its Political Influence

What happens when supporting capitalism hurts capitalists? Do business lobbies ever control the economy to the extent we think they do? The...

How Apple Locks Out the Competition with Its Digital Key

Apple’s efforts to dominate the contactless payments market and lock up the “digital key” space pose a profound threat to consumer privacy...

The Dawn of Antitrust and the Egalitarian Roots of the Sherman Act

While it isn’t particularly controversial that concentrated economic power was a legislative target of the Sherman Act, when read as a corollary...

The Varied Ideologies—and Practices—of Socialist Nations in the Developing World

In an excerpt from his new book Ripe for Revolution: Building Socialism in the Third World, Harvard Business School professor Jeremy Friedman...

How Much Can We Trust Index Funds on Climate Change?

According to a theory that is gaining support among academics and practitioners, we should expect index fund managers to undertake the role...

The Ties that Bind Workers to Firms: No-Poach Agreements, Noncompetes, and Other Ways Firms Create and Exercise Labor Market Power

Collusive no-poach agreements are per se illegal, but noncompete clauses are not. Recent research casts doubt on the rationale for this legal...