Constantine Yannelis

Constantine Yannelis is an assistant professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He conducts research in finance and applied microeconomics. His research focuses on household finance, public finance, human capital and student loans. His recent research primarily explores repayment, information asymmetries and strategic behavior in the student loan market. Yannelis’ academic research has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist, Bloomberg, Forbes and other media outlets and has been published in leading academic journals.

Income-Driven Repayment Provides a Way to Offer Student Loan Forgiveness to Those Who Need It the Most

Direct loan cancellation is not the only policy option to lower student debt. If policymakers want more targeted loan forgiveness, aimed at lower income...

The Paycheck Protection Program, Meant to Prevent Mass Layoffs, Missed Its Target

A new study shows that CARES Act funds to support small companies and prevent mass layoffs did not flow to areas more...

From Borrowing to Stockpiling: How The Virus Outbreak Changed American Household Consumption

The first academic study of American consumers' reaction to the pandemic finds that total spending rose by half between February 26 and March 11,...

How a Simple Tweak to a Federal Form Could Help Borrowers Potentially Avoid Defaulting on Student Loans

A federal program seeks to help borrowers avoid defaulting on their student loans through income-based repayment plans, but many eligible borrowers do not enroll....

Latest news

How the Rise of Labor Market Power Helps Explain the Fall of US Manufacturing Employment

A new working paper explores the increase in labor market power in the US and what’s driving it. It shows manufacturing workers...

How Manufacturing’s Lobby Won and Lost its Political Influence

What happens when supporting capitalism hurts capitalists? Do business lobbies ever control the economy to the extent we think they do? The...

How Apple Locks Out the Competition with Its Digital Key

Apple’s efforts to dominate the contactless payments market and lock up the “digital key” space pose a profound threat to consumer privacy...

The Dawn of Antitrust and the Egalitarian Roots of the Sherman Act

While it isn’t particularly controversial that concentrated economic power was a legislative target of the Sherman Act, when read as a corollary...

The Varied Ideologies—and Practices—of Socialist Nations in the Developing World

In an excerpt from his new book Ripe for Revolution: Building Socialism in the Third World, Harvard Business School professor Jeremy Friedman...

How Much Can We Trust Index Funds on Climate Change?

According to a theory that is gaining support among academics and practitioners, we should expect index fund managers to undertake the role...

The Ties that Bind Workers to Firms: No-Poach Agreements, Noncompetes, and Other Ways Firms Create and Exercise Labor Market Power

Collusive no-poach agreements are per se illegal, but noncompete clauses are not. Recent research casts doubt on the rationale for this legal...