Luigi Zingales

Luigi Zingales is the Robert C. Mc Cormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance at the University of Chicago - Booth School of Business. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research, and a Fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute. His research interests span from corporate governance to financial development, from political economy to the economic effects of culture. He has published extensively in the major economics and financial journals. In 2003, Zingales received the Bernacer Prize for the best European young financial economist. In 2013 he has been named founding director of the Center for Economic Analysis of the PCAOB. In 2014 he served as President of the American Finance Association. He is co-author with Raghuram G. Rajan of “Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists” (2003) and author of “A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity” (2012). His latest book is “Europa o no” (2014).

Populist Plutocrats as a Political Phenomenon

How can a rich man successfully pose as a representative of the poor and the disenfranchised and become the leader of a populist movement?...

A Small Step for Theory, a Leap Forward in Corporate Governance

Moving from shareholder value maximization to shareholder welfare maximization may be a small step in theory, but it could trigger a leap forward in...

Stigler Center Launches Case Study Series

On Thursday, the Stigler Center will launch the first in a series of business case studies that focus on the many ways special interest...

What Is the Role of Antitrust in a Free-Market Economy?

Opening remarks by Luigi Zingales to the Stigler Center conference: "Is There a Concentration Problem in America?" What is the role of antitrust in a...

Donald Trump’s Economic Policies: Pro-Business, Not Pro-Market

Trump is eliminating lobbyists by putting them in charge of all departments. After his election,1 it was...

Italy’s Referendum: You Call it Populism, I Call it Democracy

The “no” vote in Italy’s referendum was not unexpected, economically meaningful, or against globalization. In these regards, it was not like Brexit or Trump....

Greater Political Integration is Necessary for a Sustainable Euro

Read an excerpt from Luigi Zingales' 2014 book Europe or Not. On November 30, the Stigler Center hosted a panel discussion on the future of...

Who Is Responsible for a Declining Labor Share of Output? Michael Porter

Most researchers assume that the share of total output lost by labor went to the owners of capital. However, a new working paper shows that...

The Non-Performing Assets of Wells Fargo

The entire board of Wells Fargo, not just the CEO, needs to be replaced. In 1992, shareholder activist Bob Monks purchased a full-page ad in...

The Power of Convictions

Oliver Hart and Bengt Holmstrom, winners of this year's Nobel Prize in Economics, created a new area of economic inquiry. They also had a profound...

Latest news

The Aristocracy of Talent: Business Intelligence

In the following excerpt from his new book, The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, Adrian Wooldridge traces "how universities...

Why Privacy Experts Need a Place at the Antitrust Table

Antitrust enforcers have tended to stay narrowly “in their lane,” failing to engage with how data is collected and used by digital...

Assessing George Stigler’s Economic Theory of Regulation

Despite its flaws and limitations, Stigler’s seminal article on the theory of economic regulation remains an important piece of scholarship worthy of...

“Old Chicago” and Freiburg: Why Ordoliberalism Was No “German Oddity”

Both the Chicago and Freiburg schools faced systemic fragility as the crucial property of societal orders. It was this fragility that served...

The Many Faces of Stigler’s Theory of Economic Regulation: Interest Group Politics Still Thrives—But Industry Often Comes Second

Stigler treats industry groups as the heavyweights in regulatory contests. But surprisingly often groups of farmers and workers knock them for a...

Why the FTC Should Consider Size in Drug Mergers

Large pharmaceutical firms retain their dominance through size-related advantages in three areas: contracting, marketing and selling, and financing. When reviewing pharmaceutical mergers,...

In FTC vs. Facebook, the Government Lost the First Round. It Could Still Win the Fight.

Despite some compelling allegations, a federal judge dismissed the FTC's antitrust complaint against Facebook due to the agency’s failure to explain how...
  1. This post was originally published in Il Sole 24 Ore.[]