Luigi Zingales

Luigi Zingales is the Robert C. Mc Cormack Distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship and Finance at the University of Chicago - Booth School of Business. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research, and a Fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute. His research interests span from corporate governance to financial development, from political economy to the economic effects of culture. He has published extensively in the major economics and financial journals. In 2003, Zingales received the Bernacer Prize for the best European young financial economist. In 2013 he has been named founding director of the Center for Economic Analysis of the PCAOB. In 2014 he served as President of the American Finance Association. He is co-author with Raghuram G. Rajan of “Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists” (2003) and author of “A Capitalism for the People: Recapturing the Lost Genius of American Prosperity” (2012). His latest book is “Europa o no” (2014).

How Pfizer’s Vaccine Announcement Demonstrates the Political Power of Firms

By timing the disclosure of the results of its vaccine trial, Pfizer could have influenced the 2020 presidential election. This is worrisome...

Friedman’s Legacy: From Doctrine to Theorem

Friedman was more right than his detractors claim and more wrong than his supporters would like us to believe. However, after 50...

Capitalisn’t Is Back: Can Economists and Journalists Work Together to Improve Capitalism?

Is capitalism the engine of prosperity, or is it the engine of destruction? On this podcast, we talk about the ways capitalism...

Does a CEO Have a Duty to Lobby?

We need not only more disclosure, but also more work in alerting people in general (and students in particular) about the distortive effects of...

Serving Shareholders Doesn’t Mean Putting Profit Above All Else

The time has come for companies, economists, and society to abandon the argument that the only responsibility of business is to maximize profits. Editor’s note:...

Friedman’s Principle, 50 Years Later

In the mid-1980s, Milton Friedman’s view that the only social responsibility of business is to increase its profits became dominant in business...

Break Up the Police

In most cities in America, it is not the police that answers to the mayors, but the mayors to the police. The...

Back to Work? The Political Preparation for “Phase 2” of the Pandemic Is a Matter of Trust

According to a special wave of the Booth/Kellogg Financial Trust Index, Americans have bought into social distancing rules. However, most of the respondents are...

The Stimulus Package Is Too Expensive and Poorly Targeted: The Waste Contained in the CARES Act

A cost-effective stimulus to mend the effects of a 24 percent drop in GDP would cost no more than $1.3 trillion over a 6-month...

Why Mass Testing Is Crucial: the US Should Study the Veneto Model to Fight Covid-19

The Italian experience suggests that locking downtowns is a necessary but insufficient condition to stop the spread of the disease. If 50 percent of...

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President-Elect Joe Biden and the Real Lessons of DuPont

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How Companies Spin Off Environmental Liabilities to Avoid Legal Obligations

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How Pfizer’s Vaccine Announcement Demonstrates the Political Power of Firms

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How the red-herring of a politicized Section 230 and “conservative censorship” distracts from a bipartisan national privacy act.

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