Lina M. Khan

Lina Khan is a legal fellow with the Open Markets Program at New America, an associate research scholar at Yale Law School, and a fellow with the Information Society Project. She researches market competition across sectors, and the way that antitrust law and competition policy shape our political economy. Khan’s work has been published by the Yale Law Journal and the Harvard Law & Policy Review, as well as by the New Republic, Politico, the Washington Monthly, and the Washington Post. Her antitrust work has been cited by Bloomberg, The Economist, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. While at Yale, Khan represented and litigated on behalf of homeowners through the Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic. She also spent summers litigating at Gupta Wessler PLLC, Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. She received a B.A. magna cum laude in political theory from Williams College and a J.D. from Yale Law School.

Designating Tech Platforms as “Information Fiduciaries” Would Do Little to Address the Source of Their Power

The notion that Facebook, Google, and Twitter should be assigned fiduciary duties toward their end users has gained broad support in recent years. However, this...

What Makes Tech Platforms So Powerful?

What are the bases of the digital platforms’ power? In Chapter 3 of our Digital Platforms and Concentration ebook in advance of this month’s...

Amazon at $1,000 – Should We Be Celebrating?

Amazon, whose stock price crossed $1,000 per share last week, illustrates the shortcomings of our current antitrust regime. Last Tuesday, Amazon’s stock price crossed $1,000...

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“50 Years Later, It’s Time to Reassess”: Raghuram Rajan on Milton Friedman and Maximizing Shareholder Value

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It Is Time to Move on From Friedman’s View of the Corporation

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Corporations Are Already Plenty Powerful. Stakeholder Capitalism Could Make Them More So

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The Real Effects of Environmental Activist Investing

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For Whom Corporate Leaders Bargained: What the Past Can Teach Us About the Questionable Promise of Implementing Stakeholder Capitalism Today

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The Enduring Wisdom of Milton Friedman

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