Hiba Hafiz

Hiba Hafiz is an Assistant Professor of Law at Boston College Law School. She also serves as an affiliate fellow at the Thurman Arnold Project at Yale University. Her research focuses on legal and regulatory solutions to labor market concentration, employer buyer power, and broader labor market failures as well as improving the institutional design of labor market regulation in the administrative state. Her work has been published in leading law reviews, including the University of Chicago Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Duke Law Journal, Wisconsin Law Review, and the Cardozo Law Review, among others. Her popular writing has been featured in news and radio outlets as well as academic blogs and podcasts, including the New York Times, The Atlantic, WBUR, the Columbia Law School Blue Sky Blog, Our Curious Amalgam: ABA Antitrust Law Section Podcast, among others.

Why a “Whole-of-Government” Approach is the Solution to Antitrust’s Current Labor Problem

For the majority of America’s regulatory history, the problem of employer monopsony was understood as a competition policy issue that required direct...

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The Fall of American Manufacturing and the Rise of Health Care

In an excerpt from his new book The Next Shift, University of Chicago historian Gabriel Winant explores how deindustrialization and the decline...

Antitrust and the FTC: Franchise Restraints on Worker Mobility

As currently formulated, antitrust’s rule of reason approach is not the best tool to deal with vertical noncompete agreements that limit worker...

How to Make the Market for Real Estate Agents More Competitive

Delinking buyer and seller commissions will make markets for real estate agent services more competitive, allowing buyers and sellers to negotiate commissions...

Dislocation, Dislocation, Dislocation: Covid, the Retail Crisis, and REITs

In an excerpt from his new book Retail Recovery, retail expert and author Mark Pilkington explores the impact of the sector's decline...

Addressing Climate Change Must Begin with Verifiable Carbon Accounting

Robert Kaplan and Karthik Ramanna propose a new approach for verifiable accounting on indirect corporate emissions that would apply to all corporations,...

The FTC Was Correct to Withdraw the Vertical Merger Guidelines

The 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines, now withdrawn by the FTC, did not represent sound merger policy, argues Steven Salop; rather, they were...

The Chicago Planning Program and the Interdisciplinary Tradition of the Chicago School

The Chicago Planning Program, an interdisciplinary program that operated at the University of Chicago between 1947 and 1956, is an often-neglected part...