Hal Singer

Hal Singer is a managing director of Econ One and an adjunct professor at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business. He is also the co-author of the e-book The Need for Speed: A New Framework for Telecommunications Policy for the 21st Century (Brookings Press 2013), and co-author of the book Broadband in Europe: How Brussels Can Wire the Information Society (Kluwer/Springer Press 2005). He is a recipient of the 2018 Antitrust Enforcement Award from the American Antitrust Institute for his work In Re Lidoderm Antitrust Litigation.

To Ban Or Not to Ban TikTok: How Reciprocity on the Internet Could Backfire

Reciprocity can work on a chalkboard, in simple settings. In real-world settings such as trade, it has proven to be ineffective.

The Monopoly Harms That Antitrust Keeps Missing

In his new book Monopolized, journalist David Dayen tells the stories of individuals who have suffered at the hands of monopolists, showing...

Top 10 Admissions from Tech CEOs Secured at the Antitrust Hearing

This week’s Congressional hearing produced evidence of anticompetitive conduct that state attorneys general and private enforcers can use to pursue the dominant...

What Congress Should Ask Big Tech CEOs

This week, the House Committee on the Judiciary will hold a hearing on digital platforms and market power, during which members will get...

Regulators Turn Their Attention Towards Apple’s Exploitation of App Developers. Now What?

Congress could level the playing field for independent app developers by looking to regulatory templates in music.

AT&T’s Treatment of HBO Max Sparks Calls for Net Neutrality Rules. But Is Sector-Specific Regulation the Right Solution?

Not all forms of self-preferencing should be banned, but we do need a standard by which to evaluate allegations of anticompetitive self-preferencing....

Congress Can Move Now to Stop Amazon’s Cloning Factory. Here’s How

If there was any doubt that online marketplaces should be considered a separate market before the coronavirus wiped out brick-and-mortar retail,...

Monopolization in the Name of Privacy: Google Is Slowly But Steadily Closing Its Advertising Ecosystem

In attempting to address legitimate privacy concerns, Google could be trying to monopolize surveillance.       As Big Tech’s leviathan wraps its tentacles around online markets,...

Sorry, Mr. Delrahim: Big Tech’s Worst Abuses Can’t Be Cured Without Stiffer Regulation

Simply adding competition in the tech sector won't solve problems like privacy abuses or discrimination. Competition is needed, but regulation is a necessary element...

Inside Tech’s “Kill Zone”: How to Deal With the Threat to Edge Innovation Posed by Multi-Sided Platforms

Dominant tech platforms can exploit the vast amounts of user data available only to them to squash startups and independent providers. Hal...

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The Fall of American Manufacturing and the Rise of Health Care

In an excerpt from his new book The Next Shift, University of Chicago historian Gabriel Winant explores how deindustrialization and the decline...

Antitrust and the FTC: Franchise Restraints on Worker Mobility

As currently formulated, antitrust’s rule of reason approach is not the best tool to deal with vertical noncompete agreements that limit worker...

How to Make the Market for Real Estate Agents More Competitive

Delinking buyer and seller commissions will make markets for real estate agent services more competitive, allowing buyers and sellers to negotiate commissions...

Dislocation, Dislocation, Dislocation: Covid, the Retail Crisis, and REITs

In an excerpt from his new book Retail Recovery, retail expert and author Mark Pilkington explores the impact of the sector's decline...

Addressing Climate Change Must Begin with Verifiable Carbon Accounting

Robert Kaplan and Karthik Ramanna propose a new approach for verifiable accounting on indirect corporate emissions that would apply to all corporations,...

The FTC Was Correct to Withdraw the Vertical Merger Guidelines

The 2020 Vertical Merger Guidelines, now withdrawn by the FTC, did not represent sound merger policy, argues Steven Salop; rather, they were...

The Chicago Planning Program and the Interdisciplinary Tradition of the Chicago School

The Chicago Planning Program, an interdisciplinary program that operated at the University of Chicago between 1947 and 1956, is an often-neglected part...