Hal Singer

Hal Singer is a managing director of Econ One and an adjunct professor at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business. He is also the co-author of the e-book The Need for Speed: A New Framework for Telecommunications Policy for the 21st Century (Brookings Press 2013), and co-author of the book Broadband in Europe: How Brussels Can Wire the Information Society (Kluwer/Springer Press 2005). He is a recipient of the 2018 Antitrust Enforcement Award from the American Antitrust Institute for his work In Re Lidoderm Antitrust Litigation.

Rep. Cicilline’s Nondiscrimination Bill Would Offer a Lifeline to Independent App Developers

Contrary to the naysayers, the American Choice and Innovation Online Act won’t result in naked iPhones or iPhones cluttered with hundreds of...

Fixing a Broken Antitrust Regime

In her new book Antitrust, Senator Amy Klobuchar explains the origins of US antitrust law, diagnoses how the nation got derailed from...

Congress Is Leaning Towards a Big Tech Breakup

The dominant platforms have proven themselves to be ungovernable. Behavioral remedies, especially those that require continuous oversight, might be pushed aside. The...

There Are Lots of Competition Problems on the Internet. Parler’s Takedown Is Not One of Them.

Parler’s antitrust case against Amazon is doomed, and there is no basis for Congress to impose any special duties on Amazon to...

Facebook Could Be Heading Towards a Breakup

Assuming Facebook’s acquisitions can be shown to have eliminated emerging rivals, reversing those acquisitions via divestiture—“the most important of antitrust remedies”—is the...

The Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee Has Charted a Course for President-Elect Biden: He Should Follow It

Real antitrust reform of the kind offered by the Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee is needed to assist enforcers in precisely the types of...

Antitrust as Economic Stimulus

By attacking power imbalances, competition policy can steer income to workers and independent merchants who are more inclined to spend than monopoly...

Four Key Takeaways from Thursday’s Antitrust Subcommittee Hearing

Held just before the House’s antitrust subcommittee is expected to release its long-anticipated report on digital platforms, Thursday's hearing yielded clues as...

To Ban Or Not to Ban TikTok: How Reciprocity on the Internet Could Backfire

Reciprocity can work on a chalkboard, in simple settings. In real-world settings such as trade, it has proven to be ineffective.

The Monopoly Harms That Antitrust Keeps Missing

In his new book Monopolized, journalist David Dayen tells the stories of individuals who have suffered at the hands of monopolists, showing...

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The New Challenges of Assessing Big Tech’s Impact

Big Tech firms are facing the biggest wave of antitrust legislation in their history. Academic literature reveals the complexity of possible consequences...

The Metaphysics of Regulatory Capture

Stiglerian capture and corrosive cultural capture, its left-leaning parallel, are ostensibly symbionts, two attempts at identifying impediments to keeping markets competitive by...

The Aristocracy of Talent: Business Intelligence

In the following excerpt from his new book, The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World, Adrian Wooldridge traces "how universities...

Why Privacy Experts Need a Place at the Antitrust Table

Antitrust enforcers have tended to stay narrowly “in their lane,” failing to engage with how data is collected and used by digital...

Assessing George Stigler’s Economic Theory of Regulation

Despite its flaws and limitations, Stigler’s seminal article on the theory of economic regulation remains an important piece of scholarship worthy of...

“Old Chicago” and Freiburg: Why Ordoliberalism Was No “German Oddity”

Both the Chicago and Freiburg schools faced systemic fragility as the crucial property of societal orders. It was this fragility that served...

The Many Faces of Stigler’s Theory of Economic Regulation: Interest Group Politics Still Thrives—But Industry Often Comes Second

Stigler treats industry groups as the heavyweights in regulatory contests. But surprisingly often groups of farmers and workers knock them for a...