Branko Milanovic

Branko Milanovic is the author of Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization and of the forthcoming Capitalism, Alone, both published by Harvard University Press. He is senior scholar at the Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality at the Graduate Center, City University of New York.

The World After Covid-19: Inequality Within Rich Countries Will Increase, Globalization Will Reverse, Politics Will Remain Turbulent

The negative effects of the crisis on growth will be very strong. But it will not affect everyone in the same way. If the...

How the Covid-19 Pandemic Will Affect Four Types of Labor

A tremendous shock like that of the coronavirus totally unbalances new demand for four different types of labor. The category policymakers should be...

What Is the Meaning of Wealth?

Who's richer, a person who enjoys the comfort of modern services and technologies, or the ancient kings of a millennia ago? Comparing wealth over...

Why There Is No “Crisis of Capitalism”

Western dissatisfaction with globalization is wrongly diagnosed as dissatisfaction with capitalism, when in fact it is the product of the uneven distribution of the...

Chile's Fall From Grace Shows the Failures of Neoliberalism

For many years, Chile’s economic growth and transition to democracy have made it the poster boy for neoliberalism. The current wave of protests highlights...

With the US and China, Two Types of Capitalism Are Competing With Each Other

Capitalism’s global victory has been achieved through two different types of capitalist systems: the liberal meritocratic capitalism that has developed incrementally in the West,...

Thomas Piketty's New Book Brings Political Economy Back to Its Sources

In the same way that Capital in the Twenty-First Century transformed the way economists look at inequality, Piketty's new book Capital and Ideology will...

The Future of Capitalism and the Utopia That Never Was

In his review of Paul Collier’s recent book The Future of Capitalism, Branko Milanovic discusses ideology, social democracy, and the "ethical world."     Paul Collier’s...

The Nation-State: The Common Root of Our Failure to Deal with High Global Inequality and Climate Change

Inequality and climate change are both global problems that cannot be solved by a single country. Yet we are stuck with the political limitations...

Davos Elites Love to Advocate for Equality – So Long As Nothing Gets Done

The return to the industrial relations and tax policies of the early 19th century has been spearheaded by people who speak the language of...

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How Political Conflict Shapes Macroeconomics: Alberto Alesina’s Intellectual Legacy

One of the most respected economists of his generation, Harvard professor Alberto Alesina suddenly died at 63. His friend and colleague Guido...

“Alberto Alesina Always Knew Where The Big Ideas Were”

Harvard economist Alberto Alesina passed away at 63. Paola Giuliano, UCLA professor and Alesina's co-author, recalls his intellectual and human legacy: "He...

Bethany McLean’s Weekend Reading List: Fracking, Germs, and the Global Financial Crisis

Corruption, lobbying, corporate malfeasance, and frauds: a weekly unconventional selection of must-read articles by investigative journalist Bethany McLean. 

We Need More Respectful and Inclusive Experiments in Development Economics: A Proposal

After many years of field research in Uganda, three economists outline how to prevent a powerful research tool such as randomized...

Indecent Proposals in Economics: The Moral Problem With Randomized Trial Experiments

The advent of field Randomised Control Trials (RCTs) has made it more acceptable for applied economists to collect data in developing countries....

When and How the US Should Reopen Is a Matter of Politics, Trust in Institutions and Media, Survey Says

A new survey from the Rustandy Center and the Poverty Lab at the University of Chicago finds that political party affiliation and...

Why Social Distancing Measures Seem Less Effective in the US

Guidelines assume that the less people move around, the less likely they are to be in contact. However, phone location data show...